Guerilla open access, public engagement with research, and ivory towers

Despite the growth of open access publishing, there is still a massive and growing archive of peer-reviewed research that is hidden behind paywalls. While academics can reach most of the research they need through library subscriptions, researchers, professionals and the broader community outside of academia are effectively cut off from the vast majority of peer-reviewed … Continue reading Guerilla open access, public engagement with research, and ivory towers

Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs

Over the short break that divided 2013 and 2014, we had a new study published looking at the designs of neuropsychiatric clinical trials that involve children. Because we study trial registrations and not publications, many of the trials that are included in the study are yet to be published, and it is likely that quite a … Continue reading Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs

Do people outside of universities want to read peer-reviewed journal articles?

I asked a question on Twitter about whether or not people actually tried to read the peer-reviewed journal articles (not just the media releases), and if they encountered paywalls when they tried. This is what happened: [Click on the time/date to see the conversation] In case you don't want to read through the whole conversation, … Continue reading Do people outside of universities want to read peer-reviewed journal articles?

How to do work-life balance: learn to say “no”

I wrote a piece for the Guardian's Higher Education Network, all about the power of "no". The piece was designed particularly with early-career researchers in mind, but there might be some resonance for researchers at other stages of their careers, and maybe even more widely.I always struggle with turning down requests, which tends to make … Continue reading How to do work-life balance: learn to say “no”

On open access – practical issues

Upulie Divisekera, prolific tweeter and all-around awesome scientist, wanted to write a thing about open access and was nice enough to ask me for some help. The result, which you can find on Crikey and read for free, captures the costs of publishing and the avenues through which journal publishers make obscene operating profits. Long story … Continue reading On open access – practical issues

Introducing evidence surveillance as a research stream

I've taken a little while to get this post done because I've been waiting for my recently-published article to go from online-first to being citeable with volume and page numbers. Last year, I was asked to write an editorial on the topic of industry influence on clinical evidence for the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, … Continue reading Introducing evidence surveillance as a research stream