How about a systematic review that writes itself?

Guy Tsafnat, me, Paul Glasziou and Enrico Coiera have written an editorial for the BMJ on the automation of systematic reviews. I helped a bit, but the clever analogy with the ticking machines from Player Piano fell out of Guy's brain. In the editorial, we covered the state-of-the-art in automating specific tasks in the process of synthesising … Continue reading How about a systematic review that writes itself?

Financial conflicts of interest in guidelines

A new study published in the BMJ shows the prevalence of financial conflicts of interest in the panel members producing clinical guidelines. For consumers of healthcare delivery (that means everyone), I think it is valuable to know that doctors get their information from guidelines, and about half of the people developing those guidelines have financially-based … Continue reading Financial conflicts of interest in guidelines

Australians’ views of our own health system

In a data briefing published in the last couple of days in the BMJ, there was an interesting graphic that indicated the public perception of the healthcare system. Although it isn’t particularly easy to find the source of the information in the Health Affairs cited by Appelby (an article with open access), the results are particularly … Continue reading Australians’ views of our own health system

Ensuring safe and effective drugs: who can do what it takes?

A nice editorial about the kinds of data available from industry-funded clinical trials, which was published yesterday in the BMJ and written by an inter-continental group of authors.Ensuring safe and effective drugs: who can do what it takes?

WHO found to be lacking in credibility, again?

In an article in BMJ, Deborah Cohen and Philip Carter (a journalist) have written down the links between the people giving expert advice to the World Health Organisation about the severity of the H1N1 epidemic and the financial ties they had to the drug company that manufactures the vaccine, tamiflu. Sadly, this sort of biased … Continue reading WHO found to be lacking in credibility, again?

A pro-use stance on performance-enhancing drugs for doctors

From the freely-accessible abstract linked above: “Since the serendipitous discovery that drugs used to treat narcolepsy (modafinil) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (such as methylphenidate and atomoxetine) can improve the brainpower of healthy people, public and scientific interest has grown. Although the current level of use among doctors is unknown, data indicate that a large … Continue reading A pro-use stance on performance-enhancing drugs for doctors