How to predict the conclusion of a review without even reading it…

Short version: We published a new article in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology all about selective citation in reviews of neuraminidase inhbitors - like Tamiflu and Relenza. Lots of reviews get written about drugs (especially the ones that get prescribed often), and the drugs used to treat and prevent influenza are no exception. There are more reviews written … Continue reading How to predict the conclusion of a review without even reading it…

Should we ignore industry-funded research in clinical medicine?

A quick update to explain our most recent editorial [pdf] on evidence-based medicine published in the Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research. It's free for anyone to access. What do we know? Industry funded research does not always lead to biases that are detrimental to the quality of clinical evidence, and biased research may come about for many … Continue reading Should we ignore industry-funded research in clinical medicine?

How about a systematic review that writes itself?

Guy Tsafnat, me, Paul Glasziou and Enrico Coiera have written an editorial for the BMJ on the automation of systematic reviews. I helped a bit, but the clever analogy with the ticking machines from Player Piano fell out of Guy's brain. In the editorial, we covered the state-of-the-art in automating specific tasks in the process of synthesising … Continue reading How about a systematic review that writes itself?

Repost: Pharma’s influence over published clinical evidence

Below is a copy of an article I wrote for The Conversation. It’s an independent source of information and analysis about things that matter - but from the university and research perspective, which means it’s generally more rigorous than much of the rest. This article was originally published at The Conversation. Read the original article.   TRANSPARENCY … Continue reading Repost: Pharma’s influence over published clinical evidence