How to predict the conclusion of a review without even reading it…

Short version: We published a new article in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology all about selective citation in reviews of neuraminidase inhbitors - like Tamiflu and Relenza. Lots of reviews get written about drugs (especially the ones that get prescribed often), and the drugs used to treat and prevent influenza are no exception. There are more reviews written … Continue reading How to predict the conclusion of a review without even reading it…

Should we ignore industry-funded research in clinical medicine?

A quick update to explain our most recent editorial [pdf] on evidence-based medicine published in the Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research. It's free for anyone to access. What do we know? Industry funded research does not always lead to biases that are detrimental to the quality of clinical evidence, and biased research may come about for many … Continue reading Should we ignore industry-funded research in clinical medicine?

Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs

Over the short break that divided 2013 and 2014, we had a new study published looking at the designs of neuropsychiatric clinical trials that involve children. Because we study trial registrations and not publications, many of the trials that are included in the study are yet to be published, and it is likely that quite a … Continue reading Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs

How about a systematic review that writes itself?

Guy Tsafnat, me, Paul Glasziou and Enrico Coiera have written an editorial for the BMJ on the automation of systematic reviews. I helped a bit, but the clever analogy with the ticking machines from Player Piano fell out of Guy's brain. In the editorial, we covered the state-of-the-art in automating specific tasks in the process of synthesising … Continue reading How about a systematic review that writes itself?

A trade to fall back on

There’s a scene from “The Vartabedian Conundrum” in Big Bang Theory where Sheldon says that his Aunt Marion gave him a stethoscope as a child because “he should have a trade to fall back on” if the theoretical physics thing didn’t work out. Trust me, that’s relevant. But let’s go back a step first. This … Continue reading A trade to fall back on

How long does it take for new prescription drugs to become mainstream?

You probably don’t want to hear your doctor proclaiming “I’m so indie, I was prescribing that *way* before it was cool.” Or maybe you do? If you’re a hipster and you really need to know when a particular band stops being underground and teeters on the edge of being mainstream so you can only like … Continue reading How long does it take for new prescription drugs to become mainstream?