Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs

Over the short break that divided 2013 and 2014, we had a new study published looking at the designs of neuropsychiatric clinical trials that involve children. Because we study trial registrations and not publications, many of the trials that are included in the study are yet to be published, and it is likely that quite a … Continue reading Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs

Learning from “Learning from Hackers”

Alongside colleagues (Enrico Coiera and Richard Day) from here in Sydney and (Kenneth Mandl) from near Boston in the US, I wrote an article for Science Translational Medicine in which we related the current system of “clinical trial evidence translation” to the very successful open source software movement. We highlighted the factors in that success - … Continue reading Learning from “Learning from Hackers”

Who creates the clinical evidence for cholesterol-lowering drugs?

Last week the US Food and Drug Administration released new warnings about the use of statins for patients in the United States. The warnings that have been added to labels in the US come from worries about liver injury, memory-loss and confusion, increased blood sugar levels and some new potentially dangerous interactions between one statin … Continue reading Who creates the clinical evidence for cholesterol-lowering drugs?

Of exceptional importance – connecting patients to research

For quite some time, I’ve been very interested in the disconnect between the research being undertaken and the questions that people (especially patients and doctors) need answered. There is a huge disconnect between the two. The NEJM has published a short piece on a very well-funded institute, The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which will … Continue reading Of exceptional importance – connecting patients to research

Another approved drug may leave the market

Bevacizumab Treatment for Solid Tumors, February 2, 2011, Hayes 305 (5): 506 — JAMA Avastin is a really expensive (think 50K a year) and dangerous (people die more often) drug that has been shown to have marginal positive effects on the progression of cancer for some patients. It is a very difficult question to weigh … Continue reading Another approved drug may leave the market

Ensuring safe and effective drugs: who can do what it takes?

A nice editorial about the kinds of data available from industry-funded clinical trials, which was published yesterday in the BMJ and written by an inter-continental group of authors.Ensuring safe and effective drugs: who can do what it takes?