On open access – practical issues

Upulie Divisekera, prolific tweeter and all-around awesome scientist, wanted to write a thing about open access and was nice enough to ask me for some help. The result, which you can find on Crikey and read for free, captures the costs of publishing and the avenues through which journal publishers make obscene operating profits. Long story … Continue reading On open access – practical issues

Australians’ views of our own health system

In a data briefing published in the last couple of days in the BMJ, there was an interesting graphic that indicated the public perception of the healthcare system. Although it isn’t particularly easy to find the source of the information in the Health Affairs cited by Appelby (an article with open access), the results are particularly … Continue reading Australians’ views of our own health system

Ioannidis and Garber describe personalised cost-effectiveness for treatments

John Ioannidis and Alan Garber, both from Stanford, have just published a new and interesting article in PLoS Medicine on individualised cost-effectiveness analysis. They think (and I agree) that knowing that it costs $8.60 to get 20 extra days without the flu is worthwhile. Especially when another example says that people over 45 with knee … Continue reading Ioannidis and Garber describe personalised cost-effectiveness for treatments

Catherine D. DeAngelis leaves JAMA

The editorial describing her time at the journal is here. If you have access to the full version, watch out for the very big punch near the end. A visionary, or provoking deliberate change? Only time will tell. Still, it is very nice to see that she is leaving in the same fashion as she … Continue reading Catherine D. DeAngelis leaves JAMA

$3 Million Prize Offered to Solve Hospital Admissions Puzzle

This is a big deal - I suggest anyone attempting this would want to be good at statistics, large messy datasets and probably machine learning… or is there a better alternative?$3 Million Prize Offered to Solve Hospital Admissions Puzzle

WHO found to be lacking in credibility, again?

In an article in BMJ, Deborah Cohen and Philip Carter (a journalist) have written down the links between the people giving expert advice to the World Health Organisation about the severity of the H1N1 epidemic and the financial ties they had to the drug company that manufactures the vaccine, tamiflu. Sadly, this sort of biased … Continue reading WHO found to be lacking in credibility, again?