Guerilla open access, public engagement with research, and ivory towers

Despite the growth of open access publishing, there is still a massive and growing archive of peer-reviewed research that is hidden behind paywalls. While academics can reach most of the research they need through library subscriptions, researchers, professionals and the broader community outside of academia are effectively cut off from the vast majority of peer-reviewed … Continue reading Guerilla open access, public engagement with research, and ivory towers

Bohannon’s Science Sting – playing devil’s advocate and proposing a solution

[Update: I realise that perhaps many of you are not going to have the same perspective about the Science Sting that I have purposefully taken here (hence the title). Apologies in advance.] It took a journalist (albeit one with a PhD in molecular biology) to reveal the extent of the peer-review problems among predatory journals. … Continue reading Bohannon’s Science Sting – playing devil’s advocate and proposing a solution

Do people outside of universities want to read peer-reviewed journal articles?

I asked a question on Twitter about whether or not people actually tried to read the peer-reviewed journal articles (not just the media releases), and if they encountered paywalls when they tried. This is what happened: [Click on the time/date to see the conversation] In case you don't want to read through the whole conversation, … Continue reading Do people outside of universities want to read peer-reviewed journal articles?

On open access – practical issues

Upulie Divisekera, prolific tweeter and all-around awesome scientist, wanted to write a thing about open access and was nice enough to ask me for some help. The result, which you can find on Crikey and read for free, captures the costs of publishing and the avenues through which journal publishers make obscene operating profits. Long story … Continue reading On open access – practical issues

Open sharing of scientific data and perverse incentives

From the Wall Street Journal’s online section, a discussion about doing a new kind of discovery and what it might take. My view is that governments should only fund science that is engaged in open sharing with their peers and/or the public. Unfortunately the personal incentives for keeping data private longer outweigh the community value … Continue reading Open sharing of scientific data and perverse incentives

The Netherlands supports (with €) open access in science

As reported by BioMed Central, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) will provide €1 million to help scientists develop new open access journals or convert existing journals to open access. I’m not entirely sure that the “unexpected consequences” might be, or even how many journals can be bought with 1 million euros but improving access … Continue reading The Netherlands supports (with €) open access in science