Do people outside of universities want to read peer-reviewed journal articles?

I asked a question on Twitter about whether or not people actually tried to read the peer-reviewed journal articles (not just the media releases), and if they encountered paywalls when they tried. This is what happened: [Click on the time/date to see the conversation] In case you don't want to read through the whole conversation, … Continue reading Do people outside of universities want to read peer-reviewed journal articles?

On open access – practical issues

Upulie Divisekera, prolific tweeter and all-around awesome scientist, wanted to write a thing about open access and was nice enough to ask me for some help. The result, which you can find on Crikey and read for free, captures the costs of publishing and the avenues through which journal publishers make obscene operating profits. Long story … Continue reading On open access – practical issues

Open sharing of scientific data and perverse incentives

From the Wall Street Journal’s online section, a discussion about doing a new kind of discovery and what it might take. My view is that governments should only fund science that is engaged in open sharing with their peers and/or the public. Unfortunately the personal incentives for keeping data private longer outweigh the community value … Continue reading Open sharing of scientific data and perverse incentives

The Google effect: losing your ability to remember things

Here’s a little test for you - can you remember the phone number of your closest relative, partner or friend? For me, I can barely remember my own phone number and address. Here is an interesting article from Science. Sorry about the lack of open access. For those of us who aren’t psychologists or cognitive … Continue reading The Google effect: losing your ability to remember things

From the NY Times: ”The warehouse of words makes it possible to analyze cultural influences statistically in a way previously not possible. Cultural references tend to appear in print much less frequently than everyday words, said Mr. Michel, whose expertise is in applied math and systems biology. An accurate picture needs a huge sample. Checking if … Continue reading

Gravity as an entropic force?

I won’t pretend to understand the paper, especially since many of the world’s best physicists are said to misunderstand the paper. However, it is intriguing to imagine that gravity is a by-product of the entropic forces we are beginning to understand. I suppose then if you can understand why water forms beads on glass, then you are … Continue reading Gravity as an entropic force?