Thinking outside the cylinder: on the use of clinical trial registries in evidence synthesis communities

Clinical trials take a long time to be published, if they are at all. And when they are published, most of them are either missing critical information or have changed the way they describe the outcomes to suit the results they found (or wanted). Despite these problems, the vast majority of the new methods and … Continue reading Thinking outside the cylinder: on the use of clinical trial registries in evidence synthesis communities

Media collection about conflicts of interest in systematic reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors

As usual, I'm keeping a record of major stories in the media related to a recently published paper. I will continue to update this post to reflect the media response to our article in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Michael McCarthy from the BMJ covered the research, including asking extra questions. Melissa Davey from Guardian covered … Continue reading Media collection about conflicts of interest in systematic reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors

Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs

Over the short break that divided 2013 and 2014, we had a new study published looking at the designs of neuropsychiatric clinical trials that involve children. Because we study trial registrations and not publications, many of the trials that are included in the study are yet to be published, and it is likely that quite a … Continue reading Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs