Neuropsych trials involving kids are designed differently when funded by the companies that make the drugs

Over the short break that divided 2013 and 2014, we had a new study published looking at the designs of neuropsychiatric clinical trials that involve children. Because we study trial registrations and not publications, many of the trials that are included in the study are yet to be published, and it is likely that quite a few will never be published.

Neuropsychiatric conditions are a big deal for children and make up a substantial proportion of the burden of disease. In the last decade or so, more and more drugs are being prescribed to children to treat ADHD, depression, autism spectrum disorders, seizure disorders, and a few others. The major problem we face in this area right now is the lack of evidence to help guide the decisions that doctors make with their patients and their patients’ families. Should kids be taking Drug A? Why not Drug B? Maybe a behavioural intervention? A combination of these?

I have already published a few things about how industry and non-industry funded clinical trials are different. To look at how clinical trials differ based on who funds them, we often use the clinicaltrials.gov registry, which currently provides information for about 158K registered trials and is made up of about half US trials, and half trials that are conducted entirely outside the US.

Some differences are generally expected (by cynical people like me) because of the different reasons why industry and non-industry groups decide to do a trial in the first place. We expect that industry trials are more likely to look at their own drugs, the trials are likely to be shorter, more focused on the direct outcomes related to what the drug claims to do (e.g. lower cholesterol rather than reduce cardiovascular risk), and of course they are likely to be designed to nearly always produce a favourable result for the drug in question.

For non-industry groups, there is a kind of hope that clinical trials funded by the public will be for the public good – to fill in the gaps by doing comparative effectiveness studies (where drugs are tested against each other, rather than against a placebo or in a single group) whenever they are appropriate, to focus on the real health outcomes of the populations, and to be capable of identifying risk-to-benefit ratios for drugs that have had questions raised about safety.

The effects of industry sponsorship on clinical trial designs for neuropsychiatric drugs in children

So those differences you might expect to see between industry and non-industry are not quite what we found in our study. For clinical trials that involve children and test drugs used for neuropsychiatric conditions, there really isn’t that much difference between what the industry choose to study and what everyone else does. So even though we did find that industry is less likely to undertake comparative effectiveness trials for these conditions, and the different groups tend to study completely different drugs, the striking result is just how little comparative effectiveness research is being done by both groups.

journal.pone.0084951.g003 (1)

A network view of the drug trials undertaken for ADHD by industry (black) and non-industry (blue) groups – each drug is a node in the network; lines between them are the direct comparisons from trials with active comparators.

To make a long story short, it doesn’t look like either side are doing a very good job of systematically addressing the questions that doctors and their patients really need answered in this area.

Some of the reasons for this probably include the way research is funded (small trials might be easier to fund and undertake), the difficulties associated with acquiring ethics and recruiting children to be involved in clinical trials, and the complexities of testing behavioural therapies and other non-drug interventions against and with drugs.

Of course, there are other good reasons for undertaking trials that involve a single group or only test against a placebo (including safety and ethical reasons)… but for conditions like seizure disorders, where there are already approved standard therapies that are known to be safe, it is quite a shock to see that nearly all of the clinical trials undertaken for seizure disorders in children are placebo-controlled or are tested only in a single group.

What should be done?

To really improve the way we produce and then synthesise evidence for children, we really need to consider much more cooperation and smarter trial designs that will actually fill the gaps in knowledge and help doctors make good decisions. It’s true that it is very hard to fund and successfully undertake a big coordinated trial even when it doesn’t involve children, but the mess of clinical trials that are being undertaken today often seem to be for other purposes – to get a drug approved, to expand a market, to fill a clinician-scientist’s CV – or are constrained to the point where the design is too limited to be really useful. And these problems flow directly into synthesis (systematic reviews and guidelines) because you simply can’t review evidence that doesn’t exist.

I expect that long-term clinical trials that take advantage of electronic medical records, retrospective trials, and observational studies involving heterogeneous sets of case studies will come back to prominence for as long as the evidence produced by current clinical trials is hampered by compromised design, resource constraints, and a lack of coordinated cooperation. We really do need better ways to know which questions need to be answered first, and to find better ways to coordinate research among researchers (and patient registries). Wouldn’t it be nice if we knew exactly which clinical trials are most needed right now, and we could organise ourselves into large-enough groups to avoid redundant and useless trials that will never be able to improve clinical decision-making?

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