Of exceptional importance – connecting patients to research

For quite some time, I’ve been very interested in the disconnect between the research being undertaken and the questions that people (especially patients and doctors) need answered. There is a huge disconnect between the two. The NEJM has published a short piece on a very well-funded institute, The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which will … Continue reading Of exceptional importance – connecting patients to research

A big, important step in (public) health (economics)

The NY Times reports that four large health insurers have agreed to release claims data to academics on a regular basis. Claims data will allow us (researchers) to look in much greater detail at what is driving excess costs but much more importantly, to find out how quickly physicians are taking up new (and hopefully better) … Continue reading A big, important step in (public) health (economics)

How often do you engage in digital media for health?

A 2011 Health Barometer from Mashable and the Social Good Summit. One of the interesting graphics is a representation of how often people around the world (actually, only 12 countries) use digital media for information about health. Other interesting sections include changes in health behaviour and general relationships with demographics. No stats presented, but then, this … Continue reading How often do you engage in digital media for health?

Data breach with names+diagnoses posted online

The NY Times reports on a significant data breach, where someone from Stanford posted a spreadsheet online while asking for help on how to produce a bar graph. The dataset included 20,000 emergency room patients, including their names and diagnoses (but not quite enough to steal the patients’ identities). The data breach is interesting enough … Continue reading Data breach with names+diagnoses posted online

Useful Public health information about obesity

When it comes to issues like obesity, with its myriad contextual factors underpinning the causes, it is very useful to look at trustworthy numbers that tell us how much a population-wide intervention is going to cost, how well it’s going to work, and whether or not we’ll end up “in front” so to speak. This … Continue reading Useful Public health information about obesity

TweetQuake, from Sune Lehmann and colleagues

A sign of the future - tweets travelling faster than an earthquake so that you would read about it before you feel it. Read the original post here and then check out the amusing video made by twitter in response. TweetQuake, from Sune Lehmann and colleagues